Thistle Dew! Farms, Teas 'n Bees

Smoky Mountain Honey Small Hex Jar

$ 5.00 USD

 

Smoky Mountian Honey Pint Jar

$ 15.00 USD

 

Sourwood Smal Hex Jar

$ 5.00 USD

 

Sourwood Pint Jar

$ 15.00 USD

 

Clover Small Hex Jar

$ 5.00 USD

 

Clover Pint Jar

$ 15.00 USD

 

Locust Small Hex Jar

$ 5.00 USD

 

Locust Pint Jar

$ 15.00 USD

 

Dark Wildflower Small Hex Jar

$ 5.00 USD

 

Dark Wildflower Pint Jar

$ 15.00 USD

 

Orange Blossom Small Hex Jar

$ 5.00 USD

 

Orange Blossom Pint Jar

$ 15.00 USD

 

Smoky Mountain Honey Medium Hex Jar

$ 8.00 USD

 

Smoky Mountain Honey Half Gallon Jug

$ 28.00 USD

 

Sourwood Medium Hex Jar

$ 8.00 USD

 

Sourwood Half Gallon Jug

$ 28.00 USD

 

Clover Medium Hex Jar

$ 8.00 USD

 

Clover Half Gallon Jug

$ 28.00 USD

 

Locust Medium Hex Jar

$ 8.00 USD

 

Locust Half Gallon Jug

$ 28.00 USD

 

Dark Wildflower Medium Hex Jar

$ 8.00 USD

 

Dark Wildflower Half Gallon Jug

$ 28.00 USD

 

Orange Blossom Medium Hex Jar

$ 8.00 USD

 

Orange Blossom Half Gallon Jug

$ 28.00 USD

 

Smoky Mountain Honey Large Hex Jar

$ 10.00 USD

 

Smoky Mountain Honey Bear

$ 5.00 USD

 

Sourwood Large Hex Jar

$ 10.00 USD

 

Sourwood Honey Bear

$ 5.00 USD

 

Clover Large Hex Jar

$ 10.00 USD

 

Clover Honey Bear

$ 5.00 USD

 

Locust Large Hex Jar

$ 10.00 USD

 

Locust Honey Bear

$ 5.00 USD

 

Dark WIldflower Large Hex Jar

$ 10.00 USD

 

Dark Wildflower Honey Bear

$ 5.00 USD

 

Orange Blossom Large Hex Jar

$ 10.00 USD

 

Orange Blossom Honey Bear

$ 5.00 USD

 

Sourwood Honey

Oxydendrum arboreum

Most honey is made by bees. But sourwood is made by bees and angels. – Carson Brewer, writer

Sourwood HoneySourwood honey is so rare that a good crop sometimes only surfaces once every decade. Yet, its deep, spicy flavor makes it sought after by honey connoisseurs everywhere. The honey’s scarcity can be attributed to the very small amount of sourwood trees currently growing. The medium-height tree is indigenous to the United States and grows from southern Pennsylvania to northern Georgia. It is also known as sorrel and lily-of-the-valley. It typically blooms from June to August, providing a small window of time in which beekeepers can bring their colonies to collect nectar from the flowers.

The bloom period is quite short and beekeepers must time themselves accordingly in order to ensure that the bees do not harvest any nectar from other flowering plants. If the bees are brought to the area too soon, they will harvest from the sumac trees that bloom before the sourwood and if they are brought too late, they will miss the beginning of the flow of nectar.

If the honey is produced with the expertise of a skilled beekeeper, the taste has no parallel. Its flavor is floral and light with hints of baking spices and anise. The honey’s color ranges from pure white to light amber with a slightly gray tint and its texture is defined by a smooth, caramel buttery quality. People sometimes liken the flavor to gingerbread and note a “twang” in the aftertaste.

The parameters for classifying the honey are very strict; if it has even small percentages of other varietals it cannot be sold as sourwood. Because purity is key, beekeepers must be trained to have great critical timing skills and attention to detail. Yet even with this expertise, the production of sourwood honey is still a great challenge. The duration of the bloom season is very sensitive to rainfall and the trees need adequate sunlight in order to produce nectar, which can be difficult because sourwood trees are often shorter than the tress that surround them. If the weather patterns are not conducive to good blooming, the producer cannot make the honey for that year.

While production is inherently challenging, other factors currently conspire to make it even more so. The sourwood tree population, already limited, is constantly threatened by development. Colony Collapse Disorder also presents a threat. While this widespread and mysterious phenomenon has yet to affect the bee-colonies, an episode could destroy small-scale producers, driving them to less-sustainable, market-driven practices.

Many honey connoisseurs today agree that Sourwood is the best tasting honey available. Its syrupy, spicy flavor is impossible to find in other varieties. Furthermore, its limited region, season, and supply make it a rare treat and a regional specialty prized for its true distinctiveness. 

Sourwood Honey is made by the bees from Sourwood blossom nectar. Good Sourwood Honey can only be made with trees that bloom above 1000 ft. in the mountains of Georgia and Tennessee.

Clover honey (Mid to the end of July) has a pleasing, mild taste. Clovers contribute more to honey production in the United States than any other group of plants. The clover in our clover honey include white Dutch clover, white blossom clover, and yellow blossom clover. Clover honey has a sweet, flowery flavor and a pleasing mild taste.
Raw wildflower honey (October) or goldenrod honey is often used by pollen allergy sufferers to lessen their sensitivity to pollen by eating 1 to 2 tsp. of it each day. The idea is, that by introducing small amounts of pollen into their system by eating raw honey, a tolerance to pollen allergens is built up.

If you are planning to buy wildflower honey for its health-benefits, it must be raw wildflower honey. Heating honey (pasteurization) destroys the all of the pollen, enzymes, propolis, vitamins, amino acids, antioxidants, and aromatics. Honey that has been heated and filtered is called commercial, liquid or regular honey.

"But if raw honey is so good for you, and heating it kills all the good stuff, why heat it?"

The reason is that the majority of Americans prefer the convenience of being able to spoon, pour or squeeze honey from a bottle onto their cereal or into their tea.

In addition,
commercial honey is clearer, easier to measure or spread than raw honey and many people think that honey that has crystallized is spoiled so they discard it. Honey that has been heated and filtered will not crystallize as fast as raw honey. 

Our raw wildflower honey is unheated, unpasteurized, unfiltered, unprocessed unblended and in the same condition as it was in the hive.

Locust Honey (Late May): Pleasant tasting honey, aromatic, and ranging from water white to light yellow in color, this honey comes from the black locust tree which flowers in long white racemes.

This honey is tough to get as the trees are only flowering a couple of weeks at best and we typically have a big Spring storm which takes the flowers off the trees. This limits the amount of nectar bees can gather, so we never have enough Locust Honey to get us through a year and we will sell out.

The Orange blossom (April) is the fragrant flower of the Citrus sinensis (orange tree). It is used in perfume making, has been written about as an aphrodisiac and is the state flower of Florida. It is traditionally associated with good fortune and has been popular in bridal bouquets and head wreaths for weddings. Orange blossom essence is an important component in the making of perfume. The petals of orange blossom can also be made into the delicately scented orange flower water (as an alternative to rose water), a common part of both French cuisine and Middle Eastern cuisine (most often as an ingredient in desserts and baked goods).

In the United States, orange flower water is used to make orange blossom scones and marshmallows.

Orange blossom honey (citrus honey) is produced by putting beehives in the citrus groves during blooming period. This also pollinates seeded citrus varieties. Orange blossom honey is highly prized and tastes much like the fruit.

NUTRITION FACTS
  • Serving Size: 1 Tablespoon (21g)
  • Servings Per Container: About 48
  • Amount Per Serving: Calories 60
 % Daily Value*
Total Fat: 0g0%
Trans Fat Og0%
Cholesterol 0mg0%
Sodium: 0mg0%
Total Carbohydrates: 17g0%
Sugars: 16g0%
Protein: 0g0%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

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